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NIA Media Contacts

Office of Communications
and Public Liaison (OCPL)
Building 31, Room 5C27
31 Center Drive, MSC 2292
Bethesda, MD 20892
Phone: 301-496-1752
nianews3@mail.nih.gov

  • Scientist proposes new theory of aging
    July 14, 2003

    Birds do it, bees do it, and yes, even chimpanzees do it. They all dote on their young. And now a new theory of aging suggests that nurturing offspring is just as important as fertility and reproduction for the evolution of a species...

  • Effects of Alzheimer's disease may be influenced by education
    June 23, 2003

    The more formal education a person has, the better his or her memory and learning ability even in the presence of brain abnormalities characteristic of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to new findings from the Religious Orders Study...

  • Certain NSAIDs fail to slow progression of Alzheimer's disease
    June 3, 2003

    A new clinical trial finds that two non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not slow the rate of cognitive decline in people with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). The multicenter study, supported by the National...

  • Rates of dementia increase among older women on combination hormone therapy
    May 27, 2003

    Older women taking combination hormone therapy had twice the rate of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), compared with women who did not take the medication, according to new findings from a memory substudy of the Women's...

  • Meal skipping helps rodents resist diabetes, brain damage
    April 28, 2003

    A new mouse study suggests fasting every other day can help fend off diabetes and protect brain neurons as well as or better than either vigorous exercise or caloric restriction. The findings also suggest that reduced meal frequency can...

  • Fasting forestalls Huntington's disease in mice
    February 10, 2003

    Decreasing meal frequency and caloric intake protects nerve cells from genetically induced damage, delays the onset of Huntington's disease-like symptoms in mice, and prolongs the lives of affected rodents, according to investigators at...

  • NIH to host conference on dietary supplement use in the elderly
    January 6, 2003

    The NIH Office of Dietary Supplements (ODS) and the National Institute on Aging (NIA) will host a conference January 14-15, 2003 to present current research about dietary supplement use by the elderly in U.S. with the goal of developing a...

  • Training improves cognitive abilities of older adults
    November 12, 2002

    Training sessions for 2 hours a week for 5 weeks improved the memory, concentration and problem solving skills of healthy independent adults 65 years and older who participated in the nation's largest study of cognitive training. The...

  • Growth hormone, sex steroid combination ‘not ready for prime time'
    November 12, 2002

    In the first study of the separate and combined effects of growth hormone and sex steroids in healthy older men and women, investigators found that growth hormone replacement substantially increased lean body mass and decreased fat mass in...

  • Scientific task force to examine usefulness of testosterone replacement therapy in older men
    November 6, 2002

    A multi-disciplinary task force, led by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and supported by the National Institute on Aging (NIA), will evaluate the pros and cons of conducting clinical trials of testosterone replacement therapy in older men...

  • Free testosterone predicts memory, cognition in older men
    November 4, 2002

    Older men with higher levels of free, or unbound, testosterone circulating in their bloodstreams have better visual and verbal recall and perform spatial tasks more adeptly than their peers, according to investigators at the National...

  • Lipid abnormalities linked to Lou Gehrig's disease
    August 21, 2002

    Abnormal accumulation of two common lipids in motor nerve cells could play a critical role in the development of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to investigators at the National Institute on Aging (NIA) in Baltimore. The...

  • Biomarkers of aging news advisory
    August 1, 2002

    Three physiological measures associated with long-term caloric restriction in monkeys have been linked to longevity in men, according to scientists at the National Institute on Aging (NIA). It is the first finding to suggest a relationship...

  • Questions arise as more older Americans outlive driving privilege
    July 29, 2002

    As people live longer and more older drivers give up their driving privileges, family, friends and public officials may find themselves asking, as it was in a popular film, "who's going to drive Miss Daisy?" The question...

  • Study offers new insights into overcoming disparities in health
    July 22, 2002

    Socioeconomic disparities in health can be reduced and possibly even eliminated in some cases by specific interventions, such as adoption of a rigid treatment plan and intensive patient monitoring, that help patients better manage their...

  • Diet rich in foods with vitamin E may reduce Alzheimer's disease risk
    June 26, 2002

    A new population-based study of antioxidants, appearing in the June 26, 2002, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), suggests that a diet rich in foods containing vitamin E may help protect some people against Alzheimer's...

  • Findings show exceptional longevity runs in families
    June 10, 2002

    At ages 102 and 104, Bessie and Sadie Delany were probably the most unlikely pair of authors in history. Yet in 1993, they produced a best-selling oral history, Having Our Say: The Delany Sisters' First 100 Years. "Sadie,"...

  • NIA makes second novel clone set available
    June 10, 2002

    Researchers at the National Institute on Aging will distribute a recently established mouse cDNA microarray/clone set containing 7,409 unique genes to 20 designated academic centers worldwide. The new set, known as NIA 7.4K cDNA set, is...

  • Annual report shows overall decline in U.S. cancer death rates; cancer burden is expected to rise with an aging population
    May 14, 2002

    New data for 1999 show that death rates for all cancers combined continued to decline in the United States. However, the number of cancer cases can be expected to increase because of the growth and aging of the population in coming decades...

  • High homocysteine levels may double risk of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, new report suggests
    February 13, 2002

    People with elevated levels of homocysteine in the blood had nearly double the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a new report from scientists at Boston University. The findings, in a group of people...

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